Islamic art — Art

You have to see Istanbul Topkapi Palace Museum miniature collections

Posted by Hakan pinar on

You have to see Istanbul Topkapi Palace Museum miniature collections

Istanbul is Turkey's most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. It is located on the Bosphorus Strait, and encompasses the natural harbor known as the Golden Horn, in the northwest of the country. It extends both on the European (Thrace) and on the Asian (Anatolia) side of the Bosphorus, and is thereby the only metropolis in the world which is situated on two continents. Prior to the Turkish revolution in 1924, the Palace was the home to a community that provided all services necessary to everyday court life and ceremonial events: from mosques, schools, baths, workshops, studios, and...

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The history of Arabic calligraphy

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The history of Arabic calligraphy

A. Kufic Calligraphy Originating in the city of Kufac, Kufic khatt was the only script used to copy the Holy Quran between the 8th and 10th century.    B. Naskh Naskh, which directly translates to copying, was a more legible style of calligraphy developed in 10th century Turkey.  Pioneered by Ibn Muqla, Naskh was a hallmark in Islamic calligraphy. By using the alef as anx-height that all other characters were proportional to, Ibn Muqla solidified Naskhas as standard in Quranic scripture   C. Thuluth A more extravagant style of calligraphy, Thuluth was mainly used for titles and on architectural monuments. This style can be commonly found today engraved on glass...

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Calligraphy from Ottoman Dervish Lodges

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Calligraphy from Ottoman Dervish Lodges

Alongside the art of the book, which was promoted by rulers at their courts and by religious scholars in mosques and Qur’an schools, Arabic calligraphy was also cultivated in the context of everyday religious practice. The popular calligraphy of Sufis and dervishes is an example of artistic expression which reflects piety and spirituality to a particular extent. Characterized by the harmony of their lines and the magic of their beauty, many of these works exhibit a special aura: decorating the walls of aesthetically designed rooms in dervish lodges (khanqah, tekke), they create not only an important visual dimension in veneration and...

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The secrets of Islamic Art and Architecture

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The secrets of Islamic Art and Architecture

  One of the major contributions of the Islamic civilization was in the field of art as it went beyond the limited traditional concepts of direct representation through painting human figures or sculpting animate statues and transcended to the infinite world of abstract designs. These new invented designs introduce the viewer to new horizons where he can break loose from the confinement of time and the restriction of place and takes him to a new world where he transcends beyond the visible to take a glimpse of the beauty of the unseen.The indirect, stylized impersonal abstract art of Islam symbolizes...

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History of Marbling Art Ebru

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History of  Marbling Art Ebru

  For centuries, marbling art was an art form found only inside the covers of books. Contemporary artists and designers have rediscovered this versatile design motif, and marbled papers are now seen everywhere, in picture frames and lamp shades, wine labels and fine art. This ancient craft, named "ebru" (cloud art) by its 15th-century Persian practitioners, is now undergoing a renaissance. By most accounts, European-style paper marbling originated in Persia in the 1400s. The name of the first marbler is a mystery. The invention was probably an accidental one, made by some observant artists who noticed that paints would float...

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